Month: November 2017

The Rules of Magic, by Alice Hoffman

“Isn’t that what love makes you do? Go on trying, even when you’re through. Go on even when you’re made of ash, when there’s nothing inside you but the past.”

34037113The Rules of Magic is the story of the Owenses – Franny, who can talk to birds, Jet, who can read minds, and Vincent, the first boy in the family, who was a charmer since the day he was born. For the siblings, their life is bound by a set of rules since childhood – no walking in moonlight, no black clothes, no red shoes. As teenagers, they discover the truth of what they had long suspected, a secret their mother Susanna had kept from them – they are witches. This is why the neighbors avoid them, for there are so many rumours surrounding them. The family is cursed, for the one rule they must not break at any cost is this: never fall in love. The Owenses brought doom upon whoever they fell in love with, because in the 1600s, Maria Owens fell for the wrong man, a man who led witchhunts. More and more family secrets are unearthed when the siblings spend a summer with the mysterious and fascinating Aunt Isabelle.

The Rules of Magic is a prequel to Practical Magic, a book I’ve previously mentioned as one that’s really hard to find. However, you can read this book by itself even if you haven’t read Practical Magic. It is a rich piece of literature, filled with magical realism and romance. Alice Hoffman’s narrative technique is so brilliant that raw emotions scrape at your throat when you read this book. The story has shades of Chocolat and The Mistress of Spices, but I suppose all stories of witchcraft have certain similar themes. Each character stands on his or her own, the practical Franny, the shy Jet, and the rebellious Vincent. The plot may be described as tragic, but its beauty is beyond description.

A highly recommended read for fans of magical realism.

Rating: 4*/5

Goodreads | Amazon

I received an ARC from Simon & Schuster/Netgalley. This review is honest and unbiased.

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Paper Hearts, by Ali Novak

paper-hearts-ali-novak-rainandabookHave you ever read a book in which all the characters seemed like filler characters? That’s what Paper Hearts felt like.

We have Felicity, the so-called MC, who is really stupid and needs obvious things spelled out for her. With a brain as slow as hers, I’m surprised she gets to be a character in book (that was written and published) at all.

The male lead is Alec Williams, member of the “world famous” boy band The Heartbreakers. Like every YA hero since the dawn of time, he’s the brooding, reserved kind and only the female lead can “save” him. How Felicity would ever accomplish this with her terrible IQ is beyond me.

We have Asha, the “hot best friend”, and token POC character. Actually, I’m not sure of the POC bit – Asha sounds like an Indian name, and she wears saris (what teenager wears a sari to a masquerade ball!?), but her surname is Van De Berg, which is… Dutch? It isn’t important whichever way, cos we don’t have any background info or character development.

Then there’s Boomer, and all we know about him is he loves cars and Asha.

Plus some of Alec’s band members thrown in for good measure.

The story begins with Felicity telling us her sister’s been missing since four years. Conveniently, around a few pages in, she finds out her sister had actually been writing to her. She decides to go search for her and Alec (whom she’s only met twice before) offers to drive her all the way from LA to Seattle. Lots of random stuff happens, like water gun fights, hide and seek games. You know, usual stuff that happens in YA novels. Not. (Seriously, what 20 yo plays hide and seek ffs!)

There is nothing about this story that’s believable. It is full of grammar errors, but since this is an ARC, I’m willing to give it the benefit of doubt on that front. It ends abruptly and then you begin lamenting all the time you wasted on this.

A little note about the blurb I saw on Goodreads – it mentions Felicity’s best friend Lucy, who has some plans and designs of her own; there’s no Lucy in the whole book.

Rating: 1/5

Goodreads | Amazon

I received an ARC from Netgalley/Sourcebooks Fire. The review is honest and unbiased.